August 28 - Economic Patriotism as Shaming Corporate Inversion; "Boomerang Kids" of the Millennial Generation; Elite Education as Temples of Mercenary Mediocrity

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We begin with the notion of economic patriotism and whether corporate America can be shamed into keeping their headquarters in the U.S. rather than resorting to the increasingly popular practice of corporate inversion where they move overseas to avoid paying U.S. taxes. One of the country’s leading expert on taxes, David Cay Johnston, a professor of law at Syracuse University and editor of the new anthology “Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality”, joins us to discuss whether the White House can work around Congress to block the corporate tax flight, and the extent to which falling wages in the U.S. are hurting companies like McDonalds and Wal-Mart that cater to low-income consumers.

 

david

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Then we speak with James Marten, a historian at Marquette University and the editor of the Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth. We look into the phenomenon of “boomerang kids” of the millennial generation who are returning home to live with their parents because they are burdened with student debt and can’t find suitable jobs. We also discuss the relatively recent history of such a thing as childhood, since not long ago, children were primarily seen as economic assets meant to work, not be nurtured and indulged.

james marten

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Then finally we examine how our elite system of higher education is exacerbating inequality, retarding social mobility, perpetuating privilege, and creating an elite that is isolated from the society that it is supposed to lead.William Deresiewicz, a contributing writer for The Nation and contributing editor at The New Republic and The American Scholar, and author of the new book “Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life”, joins us to discuss how institutions of elite education have become temples of mercenary mediocrity.

deresieqiz

 

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August 27 - Assad's Cynical Attempt to Ally with the U.S.; The Economics of Ebola Treatment; The Record Melting of the World's Largest Ice Sheets

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We begin with the cynical efforts by the Syria government to suggest that they could be allied with the United States against ISIS in Syria, and whether the embattled Free Syrian Army that the CIA is supposed to be supporting has sufficient morale and resources to carry that fight to both Assad and ISIS now that the U.S. has suggested it might bomb ISIS in Syria. Syrian-born specialist on the Middle East, Murhaf Jouejati, a Professor of Middle East Studies at the National Defense University’s Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, joins us to discuss the fate of the democratic opposition in Syria who rose up against the Assad dictatorship but now find themselves fighting both the Assad regime and ISIS.

murhaf jouejati

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Then we examine the economics of Ebola treatment where both big pharma don’t see a sufficient financial incentive to invest in drugs to treat the deadly hemorrhagic fever, and where the victims of Ebola don’t have sufficient funds to buy the drugs to treat it, even if they were available. Kevin Outterson, a co-director of the Health Law Program at Boston University and a founder member of the Center for Disease Control’s working group on antimicrobial resistance, joins us to discuss what incentives can be put in place to get pharmaceutical companies interested in providing cures for what the World Health Organization calls “neglected tropical diseases”.

kevin outterson

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Then finally, with the world’s largest ice sheets melting at the fastest rates ever recorded, we will speak with Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, a Climate Scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, about how human-caused climate change is driving the unprecedented glacial melt that is causing the oceans to rise, as well as the shortage of water in California and the west, where groundwater that is thousands of years old, is being drawn out of aquifers at record rates, a depletion of groundwater that will take nature centuries to replace.

brenda
 

 

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August 26 - Secret Bombing of Libya and a Long Civil War Ahead; Public Support for Israel is Eroding in the U.S.; Saudi Responsibility for the Spread of Radical Islam Around the World

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We begin with the secret bombing of Libya by warplanes from Egypt and the United Arab Emirates that caught U.S. officials by surprise, and speak with Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, the Chair of the Political Science Department at the University of New England and author of “The Making of Modern Libya”. We discuss Libya’s descent into chaos following the ousting of the dictator Qaddafi by the U.S. and NATO and the capture of Tripoli’s main airport by ultraconservative Islamists, and the patchwork of warring factions involving various Islamist groups, a renegade general and tribal militias that all suggest Libya is in for a long civil war.

 

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Then we look into the extent to which the latest assault on Gaza by Israel has eroded their public support in the U.S. and whether AIPAC, the Israel lobby, which has been undermining Obama’s Middle East policy, is losing influence. Lisa Goldman, the director of the Israel-Palestine Initiative at the New America Foundation and the co-founder and contributing editor to 972mag.com, a progressive digital magazine based in Tel Aviv-Jaffa, joins us to discuss recent polling by Gallup that finds only one quarter of Americans under the age of thirty thought Israel’s actions in Gaza were justified.

lisa goldman

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Then finally we speak with Dr. Ali Alyami, the founder and director of the Center for Democracy and Human Rights in Saudi Arabia. He joins us to discuss Tuesday’s meeting in Saudi Arabia between Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister and Saudi officials and whether the two countries who are fighting a Cold War in the region, have decided their proxies are getting out of hand. We also discuss the routine beheading that goes on in Saudi Arabia that ISIS are copying and Saudi responsibility for the emergence of Al Qaeda, ISIS, Boko Haram and Al Shabab, and the spread of radical Islam around the world.

ali

 

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August 25 - Putin as the Fireman and the Arsonist; A Report on Michael Brown's Funeral From the Diversity Reporter with the St. Louis Dispatch; Questions About the Impartiality of the Prosecutor of Officer Wilson

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We begin with the Ukrainian president’s call for a snap election amid intense fighting in the country’s east, on the eve of a meeting with Russia’s president Putin in Belarus. Steven Pifer, a former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine who was also a special assistant to the president and senior director for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia on the National Security Council, joins us to discuss the fireman and the arsonist routine underway as Putin prepares to sit down with Poroshenko in Minsk while sending a convoy of Russian military vehicles with separatists flags across the border to open a new battle front in southeast Ukraine.

 

steven pifer

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Then with today’s funeral in St. Louis for Michael Brown, the black teenager shot by the white policeman that triggered two weeks of often-violent protest in Ferguson, Missouri, we speak with Doug Moore, the diversity reporter for the St. Louis Dispatch. He has been covering the funeral and the events that preceded it that have focused the nation’s attention on Ferguson, Missouri and the lack of political representation for the majority of African/American residents of this racially-divided town that has an overwhelming majority of whites on its police force, on the city council and on the local school board.

doug moore

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Then finally we speak with Garrett Duncan, a professor of Education and African-American Studies at the University of Washington in St. Louis, about the student boycott on the first day of school in support of Michael Brown and in sympathy with his funeral. We discuss the inquiry underway before the grand jury looking into whether the Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson who shot the unarmed teenager six times should be charged and the doubts about the impartiality of the prosecutor presenting the case.

garrett duncan

 

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August 24 - Will Syria Be Next Now That the U.S. Says It Will Not Be Restricted by Borders?; The Author of "Will the Middle East Implode?"; Putin Increases Military Pressure of Ukraine Short of an Invasion

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We begin with the announcement by the Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes Friday that the U.S. will not be restricted by borders in going after the Islamic State and speak with an expert on Syria, Henri Barkey, who served on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and has an article at Foreign Affairs, “On-Again, Off-Again Alliance”. We discuss the de-facto alliance with Syria’s Assad shaping up if the U.S. starts bombing ISIL in Syria, and the different approach the French take in paying ransom for the release of their hostages held by terrorists.

henri barkey

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Then we go to Turkey and speak with Mohammed Ayoob, the University Distinguished Professor of International Relations at Michigan State University and author of the new book “Will the Middle East Implode?" We discuss the extent to which Turkey has buyer’s remorse after having helped create ISIL in Syria, particularly now that the Islamic State fighters are threatening to exterminate Iraqi Turkmen in the besieged city of Amerli that has seriously alarmed the United Nations special representative for Iraq who has asked the international community to take immediate action to avoid a massacre of civilians who have been under siege for two months without food and water.

mohammed ayoob

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Then finally, we look into the resolve of the Ukrainians to fight the war that their new president Petro Poroshenko declared on Independence Day August 24, has “turned into a real war, albeit an undeclared one”. Taras Kuzio, a leading international expert on contemporary Ukrainian and post-Communist politics, nationalism and European Integration at the Center for Political and Regional Studies in the Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta, joins us to discuss the upcoming talks in Belarus between Poroshenko and Putin, who is increasing military pressure on Ukraine, just short of an all-out invasion.

taras kuzio

 

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